PIKI MAI TE KAUPAPA O MATARIKI TAURANGA MOANA 2020

Each year, the winter stars of Matariki signal the arrival of the Māori New Year. Traditionally, the rise of Matariki was a sign to ensure food crops had been harvested and the storehouses were well-stocked for the coming year. 

Nowadays, Matariki has become a time of revitalisation and resurgence of te reo Māori and mātauranga Māori. Matariki is an opportunity to reflect and celebrate our history and make plans for the future. 

In doing so, we acknowledge our traditions, language and culture, which together give us a sense of who we are.

The theme for the Matariki Tauranga Moana 2020 programme of events is Ngā Kura Huna: sharing important knowledge and prized learnings that would otherwise remain hidden. 

The theme for the Matariki Tauranga Moana 2020 programme of events is Ngā Kura Huna: sharing important knowledge and prized learnings that would otherwise remain hidden. 

The 2020 celebration will open doors to valued strands of learning and knowledge connected to Matariki. Kia huakina te tatau hei tomonga mā tātou ki ngā kura huna o Matariki.

Matariki, we look to the heavens to guide us into the future, to stand in the present, to grow from past lessons,
Matariki, the world that we know today, a time to celebrate as a people, our culture, knowledge, language and diversity,
Matariki, a symbol of the many faces of our people, whose heritage spans the Pacific and celebrated through whakapapa.
Matariki Tauranga Moana welcomes you to discover the significance of Matariki and explore ways to observe the Māori New Year with whanau and friends.

Matariki Tauranga Moana 2020 will see the city come alive with a programme of events including live performances, exhibitions, demonstrations, workshops, family events, online storytelling and learning.

Come along, take part, learn what Matariki means for our city and our people and bring to light the otherwise hidden learnings of Matariki.

Matariki is the Māori name for the star cluster also known as the Pleiades. While it comprises over 300 stars, only seven are typically seen. Towards the end of June this year, we can observe Matariki rise in the north-eastern horizon just before dawn. The first new moon following the rise of Matariki is called “Te Tahi o Pipiri” or the first day of Pipiri, Māori New Year’s Day.

Matariki is a time for remembering the dead and celebrating new life. Matariki was a season for manaakitanga (hospitality) that brought communities together. Visitors were showered with gifts of specially preserved food and other delicacies. Throughout Matariki, Māori learnt from each other, which ensured that traditions like arts, weaving, waiata, performances, wānanga and whakapapa were passed from one generation to the next.

Today Matariki is also about the revitalisation and resurgence of te reo Māori and mātauranga Māori traditions. Rituals of gathering to reflect upon the past year, sharing experiences, planning activities and acknowledging those who have passed during the year are important aspects of Matariki. In 1993, Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Otepou revived the Matariki celebrations in Tauranga with an early morning trek up the Kopukairoa Mountain. This became an annual trek to celebrate the first sighting of Matariki in our moana with karakia (prayers) and waiata (songs), acknowledging the arrival of the New Year. During Matariki we celebrate who we are, consent to new beginnings, plan for the future, prepare for imminent trends and look for guidance to show us the way forward.

Māori astronomical understanding was embedded in pre-colonial Māori life, culture and belief. The sun, moon and stars were an essential part of practices affecting agriculture, fishing, architecture and exploration. Tohunga Māori (specialist men and women) with knowledge of the stars valued the importance of Matariki as an indicator of the seasons, a foreteller of the weather and a navigational beacon for Pacific Ocean travellers.

Did you know that the seven pou (figures) on The Strand in Tauranga were created by local carver James Tapiata to represent Matariki?

From left to right, when looking at the pou from The Strand:

The first figure, Kahui Matariki, is dressed in a dog skin cloak to reflect the status Matariki holds in the universe. He faces Mauao as a sign of respect to the mountain. It incorporates two other constellations: Tiheru (the Bailer), depicted by two full paua shells on the lower back and Tautoru (Orion), the three smaller shells in an arch on the shoulder. The mokomoko (lizard) sits at the back of the head and is symbolic of Maui's journey from Te Wao Tapu nui a Tane (the sacred garden of Tanenuiarangi) to Te Aoturoa (the state we are in now).

The second figure is Tupu a Nuku rising from the earth. The koru on top is enveloped by four manaia. The manaia are carved in styles from the South Island, East Coast, Taranaki and Northland. Collectively they represent Nga Hau e Wha (the four winds) and the four seasons.

The third figure, Tupu a Rangi, deals with the navigational aspects of Matariki. He holds a navigational instrument in his right hand and extends his left hand out to the horizon.

Waita, the fourth figure, tells of the travels undertaken by Māori with the hoe (paddle) upright in salute. There is also a modern day reference to the travels that we take in our own lives. This is shown by the unfilled ritorito pattern around the shoulders.

The fifth figure, Waiti, depicts the food-bringing aspect of Matariki. The hands hold kumara (sweet potato) from the garden, and pikopiko (fern fronds) from the forest. Fish are seen on the left leg and a kereru (pigeon) on the right. The ritorito pattern on the upper lip is filled, indicating that the potential is also filled in a physical sense.

The sixth figure is Waipuna a Rangi. The spiral design portrays the water that hails the arrival of Matariki and the life giving properties of water. The three manaia at the top represent the three iwi (tribes) of Tauranga Moana: Ngati Ranginui, Ngai Te Rangi and Ngati Pukenga.

Ururangi, the seventh figure, is carved in the Tainui style paying homage to the links Tauranga Māori have with Kingitanga. The twelve figures represent the Tekaumarua (the Council of Elders), and the main feature represents the Waikato River.

 

06 Jun
to
11 Jul
Exhibition - Timatanga Hou New Beginning - Areena Smith
06 June to 11 July

‘Timatanga Hou – New Beginning’ refers to identifying a shift, change in direction or start of something new. Matariki is acknowledged as not only a celebration of the Maori new year, but a time of reflection, rejuvenation, and a time of connection.   Read more

21 Jun
to
21 Jul
Matariki: Nga Kura Huna - Online Matariki Information Hub
21 June to 21 July

Not sure where to start with Matariki? Why not visit Matariki: Nga Kura Huna, our Tauranga City Libraries' online Matariki information hub.  Read more

21 Jun
to
21 Jul
Tumokemoke - Nga Marae o Tauranga Moana Digital Series
21 June to 21 July

Local iwi, Ngati Ranginui journey through our Tauranga Moana marae, korero to our local kaumatua, and discover the history of our local iwi of Ngati Ranginui, Ngai Te Rangi and Ngati Pukenga.  Read more

21 Jun
to
21 Jul
Mataraunui: Matariki 2020
21 June to 21 July

Te Runanga o Ngai Te Rangi Iwi are excited to announce the launch of our NEW Ngai Te Rangi Iwi Podcast Channel, at the rise of Matariki; an online platform to share Mataraunui to the public!  Read more


04Jul
Paper Mosaic Mural
04 July

Learn the method and processes of how to create your own mosaic artwork, using ripped paper.  Read more

05Jul
Takaro kemu workshop
05 July

Participate in the Takaro Kemu workshop and have fun! Play old-school kemu (games) that are designed to test the brain and co-ordination skills in a family-fun way.  Read more

06Jul
Waka hourua: Double Hulled Canoe
06 July

Build your own Waka hourua and learn a little about the traditional Maori navigation process!  Read more

06Jul
Manu Tukutuku Activity Session - Greerton
06 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Ururangi and Manu Tukutuku in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more


06Jul
Matariki Greenscreen Drop in Activity - Tauranga
06 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries where we will digitally place you amongst the Matariki cluster of stars in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.   Read more

07Jul
Manu Tukutuku Activity Session - Papamoa
07 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Ururangi and Manu Tukutuku in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more

08Jul
Manu Tukutuku Activity Session - Greerton
08 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Ururangi and Manu Tukutuku in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more

08Jul
Huarere: Science - Tauranga
08 July

Join us at Tauranga City Libraries for a fun session learning all about what the stars Waipuna-a-rangi & Ururangi represent, including crafts to take home and a weather science experiment.   Read more


08Jul
Waka hourua: Double Hulled Canoe
08 July

Build your own Waka hourua and learn a little about the traditional Maori navigation process!  Read more

09Jul
Huarere: Science - Tauranga
09 July

Join us at Tauranga City Libraries for a fun session learning all about what the stars Waipuna-a-rangi & Ururangi represent, including crafts to take home and a weather science experiment.   Read more

09Jul
Manu Tukutuku Activity Session - Mount Maunganui
09 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Ururangi and Manu Tukutuku in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more

09Jul
Matariki Greenscreen Drop in Activity - Greerton
09 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries where we will digitally place you amongst the Matariki cluster of stars in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.   Read more


10Jul
Huarere: Science - Papamoa
10 July

Join us at Tauranga City Libraries for a fun session learning all about what the stars Waipuna-a-rangi & Ururangi represent, including crafts to take home and a weather science experiment.   Read more

11Jul
Raw Form Hip Hop Workshop
11 July

Learn about the history and elements of Hip Hop culture in an engaging workshop, using your newfound skills and knowledge to write rhymes and develop your own style! AGE: Intermediate/Young Adults up to 24 years.  Read more

13 Jul
to
21 Jul
Pātaka kōrero
13 July to 21 July

With the smell of blood and gunpowder still lingering in the air, the land we live on today was measured and portioned by the first surveyors stationed in Tauranga.  Read more

13Jul
Kumara Cultivation Activity Session - Mount Maunganui
13 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Tupuanuku and kumara cultivation in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more


13Jul
Story, Stars and Taniko - Tauranga
13 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and celebrate Matariki with our stars of the week, a story about kai and make a Taniko-cross stitch.   Read more

13 Jul
to
28 Jul
The Lost Children of Tane Mahuta
13 July to 28 July

"Since being in lockdown, Mother Nature has thrived - due to the cut down of pollution and gases. When this lockdown is all over I hope we don’t go too much back to normal and be aware of our effects on nature and the lives within it."  Read more

14Jul
Story, Stars and Taniko - Papamoa
14 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and celebrate Matariki with our stars of the week, a story about kai and make a Taniko-cross stitch.   Read more

15Jul
Kumara Cultivation Activity Session - Greerton
15 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Tupuanuku and kumara cultivation in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more


15Jul
Matariki Greenscreen Drop in Activity - Mount Maunganui
15 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries where we will digitally place you amongst the Matariki cluster of stars in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.   Read more

16Jul
Matariki Greenscreen Drop in Activity - Papamoa
16 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries where we will digitally place you amongst the Matariki cluster of stars in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.   Read more

16Jul
Kumara Cultivation Activity Session - Tauranga
16 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Tupuanuku and kumara cultivation in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more

16Jul
Story, Stars and Taniko - Mount Maunganui
16 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and celebrate Matariki with our stars of the week, a story about kai and make a Taniko-cross stitch.   Read more


16Jul
Waka hourua: Double Hulled Canoe
16 July

Build your own Waka hourua and learn a little about the traditional Maori navigation process!  Read more

17Jul
Story, Stars and Taniko - Greerton
17 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and celebrate Matariki with our stars of the week, a story about kai and make a Taniko-cross stitch.   Read more

17Jul
Kumara Cultivation Activity Session - Papamoa
17 July

Come to the Tauranga City Libraries and learn about Tupuanuku and kumara cultivation in one of our fun and interactive holiday sessions.  Read more

18 Jul
to
19 Jul
Make a kapa haka poi
18 July to 19 July

Create a pair of poi, learning the origin, whakapapa and waiata of poi.  Read more


18Jul
Natural Treasures Workshop
18 July

Create dried floral art using natural resources from your own environment – As part of the 2020 Tauranga Moana Matariki calendar of events the Incubator Creative Hub is proud to be presenting a series of workshops celebrating Maori artists and their art.  Read more

21Jul
E Toru Nga Mea - Film and panel discussion
21 July

Event celebrating a Maori filmmaker and his 3 artist documentaries in the Historic Village cinema. Watch three of local film maker Mita Tereremoana Tahata’s acclaimed short films followed by a hosted Q & A discussion panel with two Maori/Pacific artists.   Read more