Piki Mai Te Kaupapa O Matariki Tauranga Moana 2019

Each year, the winter stars of Matariki signal the arrival of the Māori New Year. Traditionally, the rise of Matariki was a sign to ensure food crops had been harvested and the storehouses were well-stocked for the coming year. Nowadays, Matariki has become a time of revitalisation and resurgence of te reo Māori and mātauranga Māori. Matariki is an opportunity to reflect and celebrate our history and make plans for our future. In doing so, we acknowledge our traditions, language and culture, which together give us a sense of who we are.

The theme for the Matariki Tauranga Moana 2019 programme of events is Tuituia a Matariki: binding together the threads of Matariki.

Tauranga Moana Matariki 2019 is a city-wide initiative proudly brought to you and supported by Aongatete Forest Project, Baycourt, Department of Conservation, Incubator, Family Forest, Hemasphere, Ngai Te Rangi, Royal Society Te Apārangi, Tauranga Art Gallery, Tauranga City Council and Te Puna i Rangiriri Trust.

Tuituia a Matariki: binding together the threads of Matariki.

Tuia ki runga: Unite above
Tuia ki raro: Unite below
Tuia ki roto: Unite within
Tuia ki waho: Unite without
Ka rongo te ao: Listen to the day
Ka rongo te po: Listen to the night
Haumie, hui e! Taiki e!: Now we come together as one.

The Matariki Tauranga Moana 2019 celebrations will bind together the threads of te ao Māori (Māori customary practices), tikanga Māori (Māori values), mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) and te reo Māori (the Māori language).

Taken from a well-known Māori blessing, this karakia talks of kotahitanga (unity): gathering to achieve a common goal.

Tuia ki runga, ka rongo te po: Matariki, we look to the heavens to guide us into the future, to stand in the present, to grow from past lessons.
Tuia ki raro, ka rongo te ao: Matariki, the world that we know today, a time to celebrate as a people, our culture, knowledge, language and diversity.
Tuia ki roto, ki te ao wairua: Matariki, a deep appreciation of who we are and the stories that uplift our spirits.
Tuia ki waho, ki te ao marama: Matariki, a symbol of the many faces of our people, whose heritage spans the Pacific; we celebrate our heritage through our whakapapa.

Matariki Tauranga Moana invites everyone to discover the significance of Matariki and explore ways to observe the Māori New Year with whānau and friends. Matariki Tauranga Moana 2019 will see the city come alive with a programme of events including live performances, exhibitions, demonstrations, workshops and family events.

Take part, learn about what Matariki means for our city and our people, and bind together the threads of Matariki.

Matariki is the Māori name for the star cluster also known as the Pleiades. While it comprises over 300 stars, only seven are typically seen. In the last few days of May or the first days of June each year, we can observe Matariki rise in the north-eastern horizon just before dawn. The first new moon following the rise of Matariki is called “Te Tahi o Pipiri” or the first day of Pipiri, Māori New Year’s Day.

Matariki is a time for remembering the dead and celebrating new life. Matariki was a season for manaakitanga (hospitality) that brought communities together. Visitors were showered with gifts of specially preserved food and other delicacies. Throughout Matariki, Māori learnt from each other, which ensured that traditions like arts, weaving, waiata, performances, wānanga and whakapapa were passed from one generation to the next.

Today Matariki is also about the revitalisation and resurgence of te reo Māori and mātauranga Māori traditions. Rituals of gathering to reflect upon the past year, sharing experiences, planning activities and acknowledging those who have passed during the year are important aspects of Matariki.

In 1993, Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Otepou revived the Matariki celebrations in Tauranga with an early morning trek up the Kopukairoa Mountain. This became an annual trek to celebrate the first sighting of Matariki in our moana with karakia (prayers) and waiata (songs), acknowledging the arrival of the New Year. During Matariki we celebrate who we are, consent to new beginnings, plan for the future, prepare for imminent trends and look for guidance to show us the way forward.

Māori astronomical understanding was embedded in pre-colonial Māori life, culture and belief. The sun, moon and stars were an essential part of practices affecting agriculture, fishing, architecture and exploration. Tohunga Māori (specialist men and women) with knowledge of the stars valued the importance of Matariki as an indicator of the seasons, a foreteller of the weather and a navigational beacon for Pacific Ocean travellers.

Did you know that the seven pou (figures) on The Strand in Tauranga were created by local carver James Tapiata to represent Matariki?

From left to right, when looking at the pou from The Strand:

The first figure, Kahui Matariki, is dressed in a dog skin cloak to reflect the status Matariki holds in the universe. He faces Mauao as a sign of respect to the mountain. It incorporates two other constellations: Tiheru (the Bailer), depicted by two full paua shells on the lower back and Tautoru (Orion), the three smaller shells in an arch on the shoulder. The mokomoko (lizard) sits at the back of the head and is symbolic of Maui's journey from Te Wao Tapu nui a Tane (the sacred garden of Tanenuiarangi) to Te Aoturoa (the state we are in now).

The second figure is Tupu a Nuku rising from the earth. The koru on top is enveloped by four manaia. The manaia are carved in styles from the South Island, East Coast, Taranaki and Northland. Collectively they represent Nga Hau e Wha (the four winds) and the four seasons.

The third figure, Tupu a Rangi, deals with the navigational aspects of Matariki. He holds a navigational instrument in his right hand and extends his left hand out to the horizon.

Waita, the fourth figure, tells of the travels undertaken by Māori with the hoe (paddle) upright in salute. There is also a modern day reference to the travels that we take in our own lives. This is shown by the unfilled ritorito pattern around the shoulders.

The fifth figure, Waiti, depicts the food-bringing aspect of Matariki. The hands hold kumara (sweet potato) from the garden, and pikopiko (fern fronds) from the forest. Fish are seen on the left leg and a kereru (pigeon) on the right. The ritorito pattern on the upper lip is filled, indicating that the potential is also filled in a physical sense.

The sixth figure is Waipuna a Rangi. The spiral design portrays the water that hails the arrival of Matariki and the life giving properties of water. The three manaia at the top represent the three iwi (tribes) of Tauranga Moana: Ngati Ranginui, Ngai Te Rangi and Ngati Pukenga.

Ururangi, the seventh figure, is carved in the Tainui style paying homage to the links Tauranga Māori have with Kingitanga. The twelve figures represent the Tekaumarua (the Council of Elders), and the main feature represents the Waikato River.

Upcoming events

24May
Ko Matariki e ārau ana | The gathering of Matariki 
24 May

In this fascinating lecture, Professor Rangi Matamua will share his detailed knowledge about Matariki, and highlight connections between cultural knowledge and science.  Read more

29May
My name is Moana
29 May

Join singer and songwriter Moana Maniopoto for a night of music that celebrates out relationship with the ocean. Moana invites audiences on a journey of music, myth and personal anecdotes, discovering and sharing the role the ocean plays in our lives.  Read more

07 Jun
to
05 Jul
Exhibition: Matariki Hao Tāngata
07 June to 05 July

Matariki Hao Tāngata – Matariki, a Remembrance. Māori portraits 1970s – 1990s. A retrospective of black and white photography from Kapua Joy Bennett (Ngāti Ranginui, Te Whānau-ā-Apanui).  Read more

07Jun
Toi Tū Te Wā - Workshop
07 June

Come join the Toi Tū Te Wā workshop for rangatahi, to develop your musical talent and gain a better understanding of the Matariki kaupapa. The workshop themes are mana, media, music and Matariki.  Read more


07 Jun
to
03 Jul
Exhibition: Ruahine by Michelle Estall
07 June to 03 July

An exhibition of artwork based around contemporary Māori Ruahine, inspired by the writing of Te Iwa Makere Tamaki.  Read more

07 Jun
to
03 Jul
Exhibition: Mātātoa – Mumu Returns
07 June to 03 July

An exhibition of Taonga Pūoro artist Mumu (Will Moore). Mātātoa, which means to live fearlessly, is the key to how Mumu lives his life, creating pieces of art that move from one state of being to another.  Read more

08Jun
Matariki toi Rahoroi ki Te Papa
08 June

Come along to the Saturday Matariki Craft Sessions at the Tauranga Libraries  Read more

08Jun
Book launch: Tīrama, Tīrama, Matariki – Twinkle, Twinkle, Matariki
08 June

Come along to help Pukeko, Kiwi and Hoiho blast off from Papamoa Library in this child-friendly event with food, activities, waiata and giveaways.  Read more


10 Jun
to
14 Jun
Matariki ki Mauao 2019: Tuituia a Matariki
10 June to 14 June

Matariki ki Mauao is a week-long programme at the base of Mauao that involves early morning walks with waka navigator Jack Thatcher, workshops for schools, evening archival screenings and a Matariki market day for all members of the family!  Read more

10 Jun
to
14 Jun
Matariki ki Mauao - Hikoi Tahi
10 June to 14 June

Come along and join recognised traditional navigator Jack Thatcher for a hikoi (walk) to the top of Mauao at dawn, and learn about Maori astronomy.   Read more

12 Jun
to
13 Jun
Sold out: Matariki Cultural Connections
12 June to 13 June

Cultural Connections is a council staff training package delivered by the Takawaenga Maori Unit. During Matariki we open this training to the public. Join us over two days to learn about our city and our region’s history, local iwi and hapū.  Read more

14Jun
Matariki night walk at Aongatete Forest Project
14 June

Bring a torch or headlight and learn about tamariki o Tane that are still awake under the Matariki night sky in the Ngahere o Aongatete  Read more


15Jun
Matariki Toi Rahoroi ki Mauao
15 June

Come along to the Saturday Matariki Craft Session at the Mount Library  Read more

15Jun
Matariki ki Mauao Market Day 2019
15 June

Bring your whānau down to the Matariki marquee at Mauao for a marvellous market day! There will be food stalls, entertainment, tree planting, games and more for all ages.  Read more

15 Jun
to
22 Jun
Matariki e-Sewing Session
15 June to 22 June

Spend time with our digital programmes kaiako (tutor) learning about electrical circuits. In this session, tamariki will decorate and sew their very own stuffed toy stars which light up when being squeezed.  Read more

16Jun
Matariki Kauri walk at Tuahu Track
16 June

Giant Kauri Trees once covered Aotearoa, come for a walk with the Department of Conservation and see if a Giant still stands today  Read more


16Jun
Workshop: Ngā Mahi Tākaro (toy making)
16 June

Come take a free workshop for adults in contemporary harakeke toy making with Marina Stokes. Learn a non-traditional method of flax weaving for fun, and create balls, snails, fish, birds and snakes.  Read more

16Jun
Workshop: a Muka Experience (flax fibres)
16 June

Book yourself right now into this workshop to learn a non-traditional method of extracting muka (flax fibres). This 3.5 hour workshop is for adults – don’t miss it!  Read more

16Jun
Puketoki Reserve short loop - Matariki Glow Worm Walk
16 June

Bring the kids along for a Matariki-inspired story and night-time glow worm walk through the gorgeous Puketoki Reserve near Whakamarama.   Read more

18 Jun
to
20 Jun
Exhibition: Mataraunui Tohu o te Kura
18 June to 20 June

Te Mataraunui Exhibition is a three-day event open to all ages. Join informative workshops, lectures by keynote speakers and experts in repatriation and preservation of artefacts, whariki and tukutuku in marae, old photo portraits and more.  Read more


18Jun
Whanake ake Matariki with Aroha ki Te Papa
18 June

Twinkle Twinkle Matariki, a fun filled half-hour of Matariki-themed stories and waiata for preschool children.  Read more

18Jun
Pō Pūrākau ki Te Papa
18 June

Dress in your PJs and join us for a magical fun-filled whanau night of story-telling at Te Ao Marama ki Te Papa  Read more

19Jun
Storytelling: Te Reo Wainene o Tua
19 June

Story time in Te Reo! A te Reo Māori storytelling kaupapa, revitilising pūrākau (ancient legends), reviving oral traditions, normalizing Te Reo.  Read more

19Jun
Whanake ake Matariki with Aroha ki Tutarawānanga
19 June

Twinkle Twinkle Matariki, a fun filled half-hour of Matariki-themed stories and waiata for preschool children.  Read more


20Jun
Whanake ake Matariki with Aroha ki Mauao
20 June

Twinkle Twinkle Matariki, a fun filled half-hour of Matariki-themed stories and waiata for preschool children.  Read more

21Jun
Matariki Allstars 2019
21 June

A live music event celebrating the Māori New Year with established and upcoming acts featuring this year: Tiki Taane, Ria Hall Laughton Kora, Che Fu & the Krates alongside some of our emerging stars. Not to be missed!  Read more

22Jun
Matariki Toi Rahoroi ki Tutarawananga
22 June

Come along to the Saturday Matariki Craft Session at the Greerton Library  Read more

22Jun
Workshop: Raranga (flax weaving)
22 June

This is your chance to participate in a hands-on raranga workshop! Join Parewhati Taikato to learn the art of weaving and create a bracelet or basket out of harakeke (flax).  Read more


22Jun
Workshop: Māori poi making
22 June

Learn to make the traditional poi with Zebulin Kapareira Mohi. Poi were used by early Māori as a way to keep their hands flexible, and as a training tool. Here’s your chance to make some yourself!  Read more

22 Jun
to
13 Oct
Hā: Lewis Tamihana Gardiner
22 June to 13 October

Leading pounamu artist, Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Te Arawa, Ngāti Awa, Te Whānau-ā-Apanui, Ngāi Tahu), will be exhibiting at Tauranga Art Gallery this winter.  Read more

22 Jun
to
06 Oct
'Blood Water Earth' by Louise Potiki Bryant and Santee Smith
22 June to 06 October

An immersive video installation and ceramic display arising out of an international indigenous collaboration between Kahnyen’kehàka artist Santee Smith and Ngai Tahu video/dance artist Louise Potiki Bryant.  Read more

22 Jun
to
13 Oct
Mātiro: A survey of photography by Kapua Joy Bennett
22 June to 13 October

'Mātiro' is a retrospective of black and white photography from the 1970s -1980s by Kapua Joy Bennett (Ngāti Ranginui, Te Whānau-ā-Apanui).  Read more


23Jun
Workshop: Contemporary Māori art for children
23 June

Fun contemporary Māori rock art with a twist for kids – doesn’t that sound like a great way to spend an hour and a half! Each child will design their own taonga with tutor Arohanoa Mathews, and then paint a tile to take home with them.   Read more

23Jun
Toi Whakairo – The Art of Carving
23 June

Learn about the cultural origins of whakairo (carving) and common bone carving designs. Carver Hei-Tuakiri (Gavin Smith) will take you through a demonstration of the art, and explain the technique and history of traditional bone carving.  Read more

23Jun
Matariki Kite Day 2019
23 June

A traditional way to celebrate Matariki is through the flying of kites – manu tukutuku. Join us for this popular annual event at Fergusson Park. Bring along your whānau, friends and kites from all cultures, and join in the excitement!   Read more

24 Jun
to
25 Jun
Matariki Glow Show
24 June to 25 June

The Matariki Glow Show is a large-scale puppet show perfect for tamariki aged 3-10! The Matariki stars are preparing for the Maori New Year, but there’s a problem in the night sky! Buzzing with great music and fun characters, it’s a show not to be missed.  Read more


26Jun
Te Papa: Naboth's Vineyard? Towards Reconciliation in Tauranga Moana
26 June

Historian Dr Alistair Reese presents a summary of his report, “Te Papa: Naboth's Vineyard? Towards Reconciliation in Tauranga Moana”.  Read more

29Jun
Natural treasure children’s workshop
29 June

Open your children’s minds to the wonders of nature! Join this Matariki-inspired creative activity using natural resources collected locally, led by inspired florist Kalena Egan from Putiputi Recycled. Children will create something special to take home.  Read more

30Jun
Workshop: a Muka Experience (flax fibres)
30 June

Book yourself right now into this workshop to learn a non-traditional method of extracting muka (flax fibres). This 3.5 hour workshop is for adults – don’t miss it!  Read more

30 Jun
to
30 Jun
Workshop: Ngā Mahi Tākaro (toy making)
30 June to 30 June

Come take a free workshop for adults in contemporary harakeke toy making with Marina Stokes. Learn a non-traditional method of flax weaving for fun, and create balls, snails, fish, birds and snakes.  Read more


14Jul
Workshop: WAI.TAI with Robyn Kamira
14 July

Learn an original waiata in te reo Māori from the WAI.TAI set list. WAI.TAI is a collective of musicians under the direction of Robyn Kamira, who writes in both te reo Māori and English.  Read more

14Jul
Wai.Tai Performance
14 July

Te Reo fusion performance – Maori rhythm and vibes  Read more